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Accueil du site > LPCNO > Séminaires > 2014 > Controlled functionalization of surfaces towards well-defined heterogeneous catalysts and beyond

Controlled functionalization of surfaces towards well-defined heterogeneous catalysts and beyond

Séminaire LCC / LPCNO

Date : 10/01/2014 à 11:00

Titre : Controlled functionalization of surfaces towards well-defined heterogeneous catalysts and beyond.

Intervenant : Prof. Christophe Copéret

Provenance : Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zurich

Salle : Auditorium Fernand Gallais - LCC

Résumé : Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts have, each, specific advantages. While homogeneous catalysts are typically associated with efficient chemical transformations at low temperatures (high selectivity), heterogeneous ones are typically preferred in term of processes (easier regeneration and separation processes).
Here, we will show how it is possible to combine the advantages of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts by the controlled functionalization of the surfaces of oxide materials and by the characterization of surface species at the molecular level, thus allowing more predictive approaches. We will illustrate the power of this approach with the development of well-defined “single-sites”, whose performance and stability can be far above those displayed by homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, e.g. alkene metathesis. We will also how this approach can be used to understand industrial catalysts, e.g. Re2O7/Al2O7 and CrO3/SiO2.
With our current level of understanding of surfaces, we will also discuss new directions in this field : understanding defect sites of surfaces and etal-support interactions at the molecular level, introducing diversity in oxide chemistry, controlling the growth of nanoparticles, the development of Surface Enhanced NMR spectroscopy and the otential of this approach in imaging technologies.